June in the garden

June in the garden

Winter is a time to rest, but there are still a few things you can do in your veggie patch to make sure the produce doesn’t slow down too much too. Clean up around the garden by removing dead or diseased growth. Collect leaves for your compost and sharpen your blades for some pruning. We prune our fruit trees in winter to continue to get a quality crop on a manageable tree size.  When pruning cut branches that are competing against each other, open up the framework and don’t forget the safety glasses. Also note to self, don’t prune when you are in a bad mood and take off too many branches. (Speaking from experience don’t take it out on the tree or else the tree will take it out on you and give you no Golden Delicious Apples!…ask my 6 year old who has declared her love for them) Other things to get your deciduous fruit trees through the winter. Apply well- rotted manure and compost to the base of the tree Any plants in pots move them closer to the house to protect from frost. If you have a young plant in the ground place some shade cloth over it using stakes to protect it from frost. Mulch – keeps the ground warm and toasty for those veggies Start thinking about what your aspirations are for your garden for spring. What do you like to eat? What fruit trees are drought tolerant? Do you need fence an area off, maybe think about espaliered fruit? Write down what you want from your garden and start planning.  One of the...
Organic ways to beat garden pests.

Organic ways to beat garden pests.

Permaculture is all about living more sustainably and creating a site that caters for the needs of all its inhabitants…including the cunning, clever pests! I’m more than happy to work with mother nature, oppose to against it, but when it comes to sharing my hard earned work with these little creatures, I simply can’t roll over that easily.  So here is a list of ways to prevent, deter and hopefully keep garden pests off your produce, using no chemicals. Keep an eye on this list and pest problems can change seasonally and I would love to hear any of your tips too! Snails -these guys are ruthless and no matter what I do, these guys comeback tour never ends! Beer traps – You can buy a beer trap from a gardening store, fill it with any beer that you aren’t planning on drinking and then watch for the snail, drink, drive and crash. Crushed egg shells – place these around your plant/seedling, they hate moving over the top. Coffee Beans – Sprinkle a layer of grounded coffee beans around the base of your plant, they hate the stuff and won’t go anywhere near it. Note: if you’re going to use the crushed egg shells and coffee beans for your seedlings remember to always water first, this not only keeps the eggs/coffee beans in place it prevents changing the PH of the soil too much. Nasturtium’s – not only can you eat these colourful flowers, but they act as a great lodge for snails and keep the soil moist during the hotter months. Snail shed – To prevent snails getting onto...
Sow and Eat Now…

Sow and Eat Now…

  It’s been a great season and a walk through our patch see’s zucchinis’, cucumbers, tomatoes, beans, potatoes, broccoli, kale, strawberries, raspberries, currants and a couple of 2 year old pear and apple tree’s. Unlike their sisters in the chook run who didn’t give us fruit for the first 2 years these guys have loved being espaliered next to the veg and we are looking forward to tasting their hard work.   Hard to believe its time to sew our autumn and winter seeds when the weather has been so consistently hot!   Once you have the seeds you want to eat start to plant use a planter boxes with a clear lid to give the seeds a good start.  Dependent on the plant I also use seedling punnets and then stack them in a tray alphabetically.  If you don’t have any of this check out your recycle bin and see what you can find to grow plant’s in. Cut the top off a yoghurt tub, milk cartons – anything that will hold soil, water and then you can start to grow food.  Next step put some organic potting mix, some compost (if you have some) into the pot you’ve chosen and sow your seeds. I find the heirloom seeds guidelines are much more accurate to the climate where I live than the commercial hybrid brands.  After you’ve buried the seed, water in with seaweed fertiliser and don’t forget to label them. To save some coin, I use a flat bit of bark or an icy pole stick to create labels for each seed so I don’t get confused and most importantly know where they belong when...