Sow and Eat Now…

Sow and Eat Now…

  It’s been a great season and a walk through our patch see’s zucchinis’, cucumbers, tomatoes, beans, potatoes, broccoli, kale, strawberries, raspberries, currants and a couple of 2 year old pear and apple tree’s. Unlike their sisters in the chook run who didn’t give us fruit for the first 2 years these guys have loved being espaliered next to the veg and we are looking forward to tasting their hard work.   Hard to believe its time to sew our autumn and winter seeds when the weather has been so consistently hot!   Once you have the seeds you want to eat start to plant use a planter boxes with a clear lid to give the seeds a good start.  Dependent on the plant I also use seedling punnets and then stack them in a tray alphabetically.  If you don’t have any of this check out your recycle bin and see what you can find to grow plant’s in. Cut the top off a yoghurt tub, milk cartons – anything that will hold soil, water and then you can start to grow food.  Next step put some organic potting mix, some compost (if you have some) into the pot you’ve chosen and sow your seeds. I find the heirloom seeds guidelines are much more accurate to the climate where I live than the commercial hybrid brands.  After you’ve buried the seed, water in with seaweed fertiliser and don’t forget to label them. To save some coin, I use a flat bit of bark or an icy pole stick to create labels for each seed so I don’t get confused and most importantly know where they belong when...
Happy Harvest Happy Heart…

Happy Harvest Happy Heart…

We started our summer fruit harvest on the weekend and after the crazy storm on Friday night there were some casualties. Seeing fruit, looking lifeless on the ground being infested by a colony of bugs and insects that I’ve never seen before, is to be honest quite heart wrenching. Like children what you put in you get out so I’m comfortable to say, with hand on my heart, I love these tree’s. I planted them with my hands,  I feed them, I keep them clean and trimmed, I check them regularly and I know that one day I will have to face the fact that I may have to say goodbye to them. Saturday morning is all hands on deck with Daisy (6), enthusiastic harvest assistant and Harry (3) the casual gardener, coming and going as he pleased. Checklist included recycled empty cardboard fruit trays from the local grocer, ladders, secateurs, hats, sunscreen and a well-rehearsed David Boon catching technique.  ...
How to keep your fruit and vegetables cool in summer.

How to keep your fruit and vegetables cool in summer.

  Its February in Central Victoria and I’m feeling the heat now my first born is at school, and so is my garden. I’m not sure which tribe of mum I belong to, but if there is one  group that caters for sweaty, anxious hysterical mother’s, then I think I’ve passed that initiation.  Nearly every day this week its hit over 30 degree’s  and when your waiting for the school bell, smiling at strangers and your Havaianas are about to melt, there’s not much else to talk about than the obvious weather.  Needless to say I cant avoid  these weather conditions but I might be able to help your garden with a few tips to keep your plants cool and to ensure your produce keep’s coming.  Mulch – Compulsary for anyone’s garden, especially if you want to grow food! Pea Straw mulch keeps the ground moist, suppresses weeds and breaks down and gives the soil nitrogen too!  The majority of the time I use pea straw as its affordable and available all year round. I layer it on my veggie patch like a lasagne.  If you have time check out Gum Tree to see if you can get a good price per bale otherwise a hardware, garden shop will sell it.  I sometimes use Lucerne (when its damaged and therefore cheap!)  Its a bit harder on the hands to handle but its got more trace elements than pea straw and doesn’t break down as quick.  For my flower beds and fruit tree’s I use a natural tree clippings mix, (no nasties and nothing treated). I top this up once a year, usually about 5 cm thick. If the mix is...